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New poll says majority of New Yorkers want to keep horse carriages

Mayor Bill de Blasio's opposition to horse carriages has few fans in a new poll released Wednesday.

A new Quinnipiac University poll shows that 64 percent of New York City voters do not want to see the mayor ban the controversial carriages.  Credit: STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images A new Quinnipiac University poll shows that 64 percent of New York City voters do not want to see the mayor ban the controversial carriages.
Credit: STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images

Mayor Bill de Blasio's opposition to horse-drawn carriages has few fans in a new poll released Wednesday.

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A new Quinnipiac University poll shows that 64 percent of New York City voters do not want to see the mayor ban the controversial carriages. The feeling is shared by a majority in each measured demographic, Democrat or Republican, man or woman.

In fact, the number of those defending the carriage industry saw an increase, up from the 61 percent measured in January.

The new poll also had some bad news for the de Blasio administration's push for a tax on the city's wealthy to pay of universal prekindergarten.

Eighty six percent of New York City residents polled support a universal statewide program. The coalition behind the mayor's push for prekindergarten called the results proof of the momentum towards the mayor's goals.

"New York’s voters are clear – they want their elected officials to pass a budget that includes a real pre-K plan," UPKNYC campaign director Josh Gold said in a statement soon after the numbers came out.

However, the poll specifically asked voters whether they preferred de Blasio's call for a tax on New Yorkers making $500,000 or more to Gov. Andrew Cuomo's commitment to funding without a tax.

Only 35 percent of New Yorkers polled support a tax hike. Fifty four percent would rather use existing funds.

On education in general, de Blasio also faces tough numbers, with 49 percent of New York City voters who disprove of his handing of public schools. Fifty five percent if city residents with kids in public school are also unhappy with the mayor's job.

His education chancellor doesn't fare any better. Thirty six percent are dissatisfied with Carmen Fariña, while 34 percent approve. Of those asked with children in the public school system, only 37 percent give the former educator high marks, while 45 percent disapprove.

The results are based on interviews with 1,234 New York City voters between March 12 and 17, and has with a margin of error of plus or minus 2.8 percentage points

Follow Chester Jesus Soria on Twitter @chestersoria

 
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