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New York State students graduate on time slightly below national rate: Report

Overall, New York State ranks 34th nationwide for students who graduated in 2012 within three or four years of starting high school.

graduation degree New York state ranks 34th nationwide for students who graduated in 2012 within three or four years of starting high school. Credit: Metro File Photo

A new report shows that New York state's high school students are graduating on time at a slightly lower percentage than the national average.

Overall, the state ranks 34th nationwide for students who graduated in 2012 within three or four years of starting high school.

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The report, "Building a Grad Nation: Progress and Challenge in Ending the High School Dropout Epidemic," was released Monday by a coalition of education and civic groupsaiming for a 90 percent graduation rate by 2020.

Disparities in the graduation rate remain, however. Across the state, the report found that wealthier students were more likely to graduate on time at 84 percent, compared to 68 percent of lower income students.

The report also found nationwide trends showing that in the country's industrial hubs, including New York, young men of color still have low graduation rates.

In New York, the report indicates that 63 percent of African-American students graduated on time, compared to the nationwide average of 65 percent. Sixty-three precent of Hispanic students graduated on time statewide, far fewer than the 76 percent estimated throughout the country.

And while federal numbers don't provide an adequate breakdown by gender and race or ethnicity, the authors estimate that the graduation rate for African-American young men alone is likely in the 50 to 59 percent range.

The report remarks that the there has been overall improvement in addressing the socioeconomic gap, but that significant weaknesses remain.

"Unless we meet these challenges, our momentum will stall," the report said, "and although we will have moved beyond poor performance, we will not have achieved the outcomes our future demands."

Follow Chester Jesus Soria on Twitter@chestersoria

 
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