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NexGen Bicycles: Electric bike shop opens in South Boston

A new bicycle shop that opened South Boston this week is catering to the cycling community's electric sect.

Elias Moe of newly opened NexGen Bicycle Company Ltd in South Boston. PHOTO: NICOLAUS CZARNECKI/METRO  Elias Moe of newly opened NexGen Bicycle Company Ltd in South Boston. PHOTO: NICOLAUS CZARNECKI/METRO

A new bicycle shop that opened South Boston this week is catering to the cycling community's electric sect.

NexGen Bicycle Company, located at at 121 Boston St., sells electric and foldable bikes, which, unlike traditional bikes, can be taken onto the MBTA during rush hour. The company also converts regular bikes to electric ones, and designs and builds custom-made electric bikes.

To NexGen BicyclesOperations Engineer Elias Moe, 34, the perks of going electric are clear.

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"If someone has a five or 10-mile commute, hopping on an electric bike is way faster than using a combo of walking and [the T]. Plus, a lot of people can't show up sweaty and gross to work," said Moe, referring to the lack of pedaling necessary with electric bikes.

Like many Bostonians, the Allston resident cycles to work everyday, "sometimes riding the lighting, sometimes using the quads," he said, referring to switching it up between electric and traditional bikes.

Considering the speediness of electric bikes, one might wonder whether cars and pedestrians will be bothered by battery-powered cyclists zooming past them at 20 miles-per-hour, but Moe believes the city is ready for it.

"[Going electric] isn't about replacing your bike. It's about replacing your other modes of transportation," he said. "Boston has the cycling infrastructure. I could definitely see its popularity growing, not just in Boston, but all over the country.

It's electric, boogie woogie boogie!

Pros:
They're fast - reaching speeds of 20 miles per hour - the federal limit for what's legally considered a bike vs. a motorized vehicle.

They're easy - allowing the cyclist to opt out of pedaling and rely on the electric system.

Cons:
They weigh between 10 and 20 pounds more than a traditional bike.

They cost more. NexGen bikes run up to $1,800.

Follow Morgan Rousseau on Twitter: @MetroMorgan
Follow Metro Boston on Twitter: @MetroBOS

 
 
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