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NYS state forces thrift shops comply with ban on drawstring apparel for kids

Nine New York City thrift shops were reprimanded by the state attorney general for selling children's clothes with drawstrings around the neck and waist.

Inspectors with Attorney General Eric Schneiderman's offices across these state visited a total of 51 stores in late July, 46 of which were found selling shirts, sweatshirts, pants, shorts and skirts for kids with drawstrings banned by state law since 2003. Credit: Andrew Burton/Getty Images Inspectors with Attorney General Eric Schneiderman's offices across these state visited a total of 51 stores in late July, 46 of which were found selling shirts, sweatshirts, pants, shorts and skirts for kids with drawstrings banned by state law since 2003.
Credit: Andrew Burton/Getty Images

Nine New York City thrift shops were reprimanded by the state attorney general for selling children's clothes with drawstrings around the neck and waist.

Inspectors with Attorney General Eric Schneiderman's offices across these state visited a total of 51 stores in late July, 46 of which were found selling shirts, sweatshirts, pants, shorts and skirts for kids with drawstrings banned by state law since 2003.

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Among the five boroughs, four of the stores are operated by Goodwill Industries and three were affiliated with The Salvation Army.

"There's no question it's a difficult job when you consider the sheer volume of donations we ask our people to screen," Salvation Army Lieutenant Colonel Hugh Steele said in a statement about how the banned clothing ended up on store shelves.

"The fact these items are one-of-a-kind means it's not as simple as removing a certain rack, as it does for retailers of merchandise."

Steele added that the nonprofit advised its resellers to screen and reject the items in question.

In New York, it is illegal to sell children's clothing as big as size 12 that has a drawstring at the neck. Drawstrings are only allowed at the waist of a bottom garment or at the bottom of an top garment in children’s clothing sized from 2T to 16 — as long as they meet certain requirements.

"No child should be put at risk simply because of the clothing that he or she is wearing," Schneiderman wrote in a statement.

Contributing reporting by Reuters.

Follow Chester Jesus Soria on Twitter@chestersoria

 
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