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Occupy Boston: Don’t have to go home, but you can’t stay here

At the Occupy Boston site, the words “Get a Job” are scrawled across aninformation chart where people can sign up to participate.

At the Occupy Boston site, the words “Get a Job” are scrawled across an information chart where people can sign up to participate.

But those who aren’t there to help are being asked to leave.

Occupy Boston members have been evicting people not conducive to the movement’s message through general consensus and mediated removal efforts.

Two former occupiers that were part of the financial team at Tent City in Dewey Square were banned from the campgrounds recently for allegedly funneling money without the group’s permission.

On Nov. 3, the general assembly passed campsite legislation to keep Paul Carnes and Sidney Sherrel out of the site for their alleged “lack of accountability and transparency.”

“We aren’t going to evict someone for something light,” said protester Robin Jacks. “With Paul … people had the idea he was allowed back in camp and we wanted to make clear that he wasn’t.”

Problem protesters habitually using drugs and alcohol have also been the target of camp “removal efforts.”

“In order for residents to feel safe and … to prevent our movement from being undermined or destroyed by violence or criminality, we must agree upon a process by which we remove dangerous individuals,” group members posted on their website.

There is an in-depth, 10-step process for giving someone the boot.



If they refuse to leave, the camp uses the “Rainbow” tactic, forming “a soft blockade” of people to nonviolently exclude the individual.

Follow Steve Annear on Twitter @steveannear

 
 
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