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Breast cancer awareness exhibit on display now

A commuter pauses to look at an exhibit by the PA Breast Cancer Coalition featuring photographs and stories of breast cancer survivors at SEPTA's Market East train station. A commuter pauses to look at an exhibit by the PA Breast Cancer Coalition featuring photographs and stories of breast cancer survivors at SEPTA's Market East train station. Credit: Charles Mostoller/METRO

Pat Halpin-Murphy, president and founder of PA Breast Cancer Coalition, calls SEPTA’s Market East station one of the best locations the group has ever had to display their annual photo exhibit, this time depicting 67 local women who have had breast cancer affect their lives.

“To have it at a place where many women can see it is great,” Halpin-Murphy said.

From now until Oct. 9, 20 seven-foot panels depicting photographs of women and their personal stories will be on display. And the message is quite clear.

“Breast cancer has a very good rate of recovery and we urge women to get their yearly mammograms starting at age 40," Halpin-Murphy said. "It’s also an opportunity for women who have been touched by the disease to tell their stories. And for other women who are going through the experience.”

SEPTA employee Jeri Morton may not depicted on the display but spoke at the exhibit’s kickoff ceremony last week about how early detection saved her life.

A commuter pauses to look at an exhibit by the Breast Cancer Coalition featuring photographs and stories of breast cancer survivors in the Market East train station. Credit: Charles Mostoller/METRO A commuter pauses to look at an exhibit by the Breast Cancer Coalition featuring photographs and stories of breast cancer survivors in the Market East train station. Credit: Charles Mostoller/METRO

“For me, I’m a testimony to the fact that early detection is key,” said Morton, operations administrator for SEPTA. “They caught mine so early. It was smaller than a grain of sand.”

Morton was diagnosed in 2005 after an abnormal mammogram was taken when the Fox Chase Cancer Center mammogram van visited SEPTA. She said the display is great for women to know they are not alone.

“You have support,” Morton said. “Making it public like this, people are much, much more aware.”

The PBCC’s goal is just that — to support women before and after the treatment, to fund research and to work to find a cure now.

“We underline the "now" so our daughters don’t have to find a cure,” said Halpin-Murphy, a 20-year breast cancer survivor herself.

Later this month, PBCC will celebrate its 20th anniversary. For more information, visit www.pabreastcancer.org.

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