Rikard Larma/Metro Rikard Larma/Metro

Peter McAndrews wants to serve horsemeat in his restaurant. You got a problem with that?

"If you try it and don't like it, hey, that's OK, but don't sell it down the river until you've tried it," said McAndews, who owns several restaurants in town including Monsu.

He said he would welcome protestors.

 

"Let them come and protest I love it I'll hose 'em all down with a fire hose," McAndrews said. "Hey, if I want to be fat, let me be fat. ... it's government micromanaging the people. If I want to sit at my house and drink a case of beer that's my problem."

City Council approved Councilman William Greenlee’s bill that requires horse owners to obtain a license. He didn't like the idea.

"I would not go to such a restaurant that serves horse meat, I can tell you that," he said.

McAndrews said Greenlee's remark, "upsets me.”

“It's moderately child-like,” he said. “It sounds like something one of my kids would say."

Government shouldn’t dictate what its people can eat, McAndrews said.

"You know, consumer pressure and fears put on by our government dictates what we're allowed to eat," he said. "Which I think is shameful."

McAndrews replicated an Italian dish at Monsu’s using Goat meat in lieu of Horsemeat. “I would love to have the authentic thing on the menu," he said.

It is still illegal to serve horsemeat, but McAndrews believes that might change. Right now it's available in Europe and Canada.

"In Sicily it's commonly served like a cheesesteak would be over here,” he said.

"People see horses as a beautiful creature not to be consumed," he added. "They look at cows in a different view, I don't know why, you know what I mean? It's just more or less the PR that the horse gets as opposed to the cow."

Follow me on Twitter @tommyrowan

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