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Philly remembers victim Anne Bryan

More than 400 people packed the Rotunda of the school's historic building Sunday for a memorial service in Bryan's honor.

About 400 people, including L&I Commissioner Carlton Williams, gathered to memorialize Anne Bryan. Rikard Larma/METRO About 400 people, including L&I Commissioner Carlton Williams, gathered to memorialize Anne Bryan. Rikard Larma/METRO

Anne Bryan's memory was alive at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts.

She was an artist, experimenting with colors and techniques as she studied painting at the school's North Broad Street campus.

She was a romantic, pushing her family to eat dinner by candlelight.

She was a sister, slipping apology notes under her brother Chris' bedroom door after the two were punished for fighting.

She's gone, having died in the Salvation Army thrift store Wednesday after a building collapsed on top of the one-story shop at 22nd and Market Streets.

More than 400 people packed the Rotunda of the school's historic building Sunday for a memorial service in Bryan's honor.

Her father Jay said in the family's fear and helplessness, they've turned to prayer. "I always joked you were destined to be a saint," he said. "I need to believe you're not gone, and I do believe that."

Anne Bryan was a cook. "Someone else will have to finish the family cookbook," Jay Bryan said.

She was sensitive, crying when her dog, Tootsie, died last week.

She'll be missed. "She was there when I needed someone to talk to. It's a hard thing to lose," Chris Bryan said. "She's irreplaceable."

 
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