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PHOTOS: Baby falcons born on city bridges

The city Department of Environmental Protection tagged six baby falcons hatched on the Throgs Neck and Marine Parkway bridges.

Six peregrine falcon chicks hatched last month on top of two city bridges: two males and one female on the Marine Parkway-Gil Hodges Memorial Bridge, and two females and one male at the Throgs Neck Bridge.

The falcon chicks have been banded as part of a state-run nesting program started in New York City in 1983. A specialist at the New York City Department of Environmental Protection, Chris Nadareski, coordinates the program in the city, climbing to the tops of various bridges and buildings to band and record falcons.

The Marine Parkway chicks hatched on top of the 215-foot Rockaway Tower, and the Throgs Neck chicks hatched on top of the 360-foot Bronx Tower.

Peregrine falcons became endangered in the 1960s because of pesticides in their food supply. They are still on the State Department of Environmental Conservation's endangered birds list.

Peregrine falcons mate for life and nest in the same spot every year. They eat pigeons and small birds, hunting from the tops of bridges, church steeples and high-rise buildings.

Follow Danielle Tcholakian on Twitter @danielleiat

 
 
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