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Pit bull saves owner from getting hit by train

A pit bull pulled its owner to safety as a train came barreling down the tracks. It had to have its leg amputated, but survived.

A dog frantically pulled its owner from the tracks in Shirley, Massachusetts, moments before a freight train came barreling through, hitting the canine.

According to reports, 8-year-old Lilly, a pit bull, dragged her unconscious owner out of the train's path on May 4, but was unable to move in time to avoid being hit herself.

While her owner, Christine Spain, was OK, Lilly lost the muscle and skin on her right foot, broke her pelvis in multiple places and suffered from internal injuries.

The train's conductor told Shirley police he saw the dog drag Spain away from the oncoming train, and after being hit, stayed by Spain's side until help arrived, despite her injuries.

According to police, Spain passed out while walking the dog, on the way to a friend's house.

The dog was taken to an animal hospital in Acton, and then rushed to the Angell Animal Medical Center in Boston, where emergency veterinarians examined Lilly.

Doctors there had to amputate the dog's right front leg because of the extensive injury it sustained after being hit by the train.

Lilly had a second surgery on Sunday and is now recovering at Angell's Emergency and Critical Care unit.

According to reports, Lilly was a present to Spain, given to her by her son, Boston Police officer David Lanteigne, for therapy.

"Lilly's recovery from this horrific ordeal is my top priority right now and I'll do everything possible to get her back home to us," said Lanteigne.

Doctors at the MSPCA said bills for Lilly's medical treatment will run thousands of dollars, so they have started a fund for the inured animal where people can donate to help her get better.

"Lilly's selfless bravery has captured the hearts of our entire staff. Her injuries are very serious and her road to recovery will be long. But she's got the character and spirit that sometimes trumps all of our medical advances when it comes to recovery," said Dr. Meg Whalen, a staff criticalist at Angell's Emergency and Critical Care unit.

 
 
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