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Police unions file motion to intervene in stop-and-frisk ruling

Five police unions filed a motion Wednesday evening to intervene in the federal stop-and-frisk case, though one union filed separately from the rest.

cop nypd police officer police involved shooting pit bull The city's five police unions filed a motion to intervene in the federal stop-and-frisk case. Credit: Metro File Photo

The Patrolmen's Benevolent Association put out a statement Wednesday announcing they would file a motion Wednesday evening to intervene in the federal stop-and-frisk case, Floyd v. City of New York.

The judge in that case, Judge Shira Scheindlin, found that the NYPD carries out its stop-and-frisk practice in a discriminatory and unconstitutional way, and ordered various remedies, including a federal monitor with oversight of the department to enforce reform.

The PBA's motion was filed with three other unions: the detectives, lieutenants and captains unions. The Sergeants Benevolent Association filed a separate appeal.

"The SBA, we're going this one alone," SBA President Ed Mullins attested firmly. Mullinsdescribed Scheindlin as "one of the most overturned judges in the country."

"I support whatever they're doing," he added, "but I am going to take this appeal on our own."

Mullins said the decision is largely one of expediency.

"I don't have the time to debate back and forth on the way things are done," he explained. "I'm representing sergeants on this particular case. I think it's good if everyone else gets involved and I'm more than happy to help everyone along the way, but I can't sit back and wait for a decision to be made to get things done."

He said he doesn't necessarily take issue with everything in Scheindlin's ruling.

"I don't have a problem with the outside monitor, although I think it's a waste," Mullins said.

"I know it's a feel good for the community," he granted, and allowed that there is potential a monitor can "come in and educate better."

"No harm, no foul," he said.

Mullins said he felt it was necessary to step in and establish the union as an injured party out of concern that the next mayor would pull Mayor Michael Bloomberg's appeal of Scheindlin's decision.

"If the next mayor pulls the appeal, the appeal will stand with us as one of the injured parties," he explained.

Republican candidate Joe Lhota has vowed to continue Bloomberg's appeal. Democratic frontrunner Bill de Blasio would unquestioningly drop it. Bill Thompson, who may still be in the race if a runoff is declared next week after remaining affidavit and absentee ballots are counted, has also said he would drop it.

Follow Danielle Tcholakian on Twitter @danielleiat

 
 
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