Skin infections from fish markets outbreak double in a month

The city said there have been 66 reported cases of the infection, which was predominantly found to affect those who handled live or raw seafood.

The city said there have been 66 reported cases of the infection, which was predominantly found to affect those who handled live or raw seafood in the Manhattan, Brooklyn or Queens Chinatowns.
Credit: NYC Health Department

 

The number of New Yorkers suffering from a rare skin infection doubled within the last month, according to the city's Health Department.

 

 

On Thursday, the city said there have been 66 reported cases of the infection, which was predominantly found to affect those who handled live or raw seafood in the Manhattan, Brooklyn or Queens Chinatowns.

 

The Health Department's earliest report about the outbreak was in early March, when there were only 30 reported cases.

However, officials said on Thursday that the increase in rep rotes doesn't necessarily mean all new cases of the infection, caused by bacteria called Mycobacterium marinum.

The Health Department also said that most of the recently reported cases were probably likely sought medical attention for existing conditions after it released more information on the outbreak.

Some of the recently reported cases were probably likely sought medical attention for existing conditions after it released more information on the outbreak, according to the Health Department.

"Most people seem to have been infected last fall, with a few number of people having reported that their symptoms started more recently," a spokesperson with the agency said. "We are investigating each reported case."

Symptoms include red, tender lumps or swelling under the skin of their hands or arms and occasional swelling or pain in the hands or arms.

As previously reported, agency said there is no evidence that eating seafood leads to infection nor can it be transferred between people.

Nonetheless, the city continues to recommends anyone handling either live or raw seafood, or containers with either, use waterproof gloves.

Follow Chester Jesus Soria on Twitter@chestersoria

 
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