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Kittens that snarled subway service now ready for adoption

Arthur and August narrowly missed a "cat-astrophe" on the subway in August. Now, these rescued stray kittens are ready to be welcomed into a permanent home.

Arthur and August narrowly missed a "cat-astrophe" on the subway tracks, snarling B and Q train service for hours in August. Now, these rescued stray kittens are ready for their next adventure — a permanent home.

The eight-week-old gray tabby and black kittens found their way into Brooklyn’s Church Avenue station in Ditmas Park on Aug. 29. They decided the third rail was the "purrfect" place for a cat-nap (sorry, we had to). The MTA shut down power to the B and Q lines to avoid running over or electrocuting the kittens, who were retrieved by 6:30 p.m.

Since then, the mischievous duo has been under the watchful eye of Animal Care and Control's Brooklyn Care Center. Director of development and communications Richard Gentles tells Metro that despite the chaos they caused this summer, the kittens are actually pretty shy.

“They’re always hiding,” Gentles said of the now four-month-old cats. “They’re kittens, so they’re playful and get into things, and they’re curious; they’re just typical kittens that way. When they go to a new home, they’ll probably tend to hide a little bit more than another kitten would, just until they get used to the people that they’re with and their environment. But we expect them to warm up and be absolute wonderful members of their new family.”

While Arthur spent some time in the hospital with a weakened immune system and an eye infection, Gentles said both kittens are healthy now. The pair got the chance to test out home life in an AC&C foster home.

“They went to a foster home for socialization — not with other cats — because they presumably never lived in a home before, so they needed to be socialized,” Gentles said. “And they were never handled by people until they were rescued, so they needed to get used to people as well.”

What does all this mean? They’re ready to be adopted now, but only as a pair.

“They’re bonded and they really rely on each other, so that’s why we want to keep them together,” Gentles said. “They’re special kitties, and we want them to go to a very special home. They would probably be better in a home with no kids or older kids, because they’re still a little on the shy side.”

Arthur and August are not the only animals in need of a home.

“We have so many other cats and kittens that need to be adopted; it’s not just all about them,” Gentles added. “It’s also donating to the STAR (Special Treatment and Recovery) fund. These private donations are what help save animals lives. It’s a great way to help if you can’t adopt.”

You can learn more about the Animal Care and Control’s STAR fund here.

 
 
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