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T.J. Maxx regrets shooing Boston bombing survivor's service dog

T.J. Maxx has apologized after a store manager in New Hampshire last week told Boston Marathon bombing survivor Sydney Corcoran that she must put her service dog in a carriage or leave the store.

BOSTON - APRIL 21: Celeste Corcoran, center, who lost both legs in last years bombing attack, and her daughter Sydney Corcoran, right, who suffered serious leg injuries, joined Corcorans sister, runner Carmen Acabbo, near the Boston Marathon finish line at about 4 p.m. during the 118th Boston Marathon on Monday, April 21, 2014. The Corcorans were waiting for Carmen to finish the race last year when the attack happened. (Photo by John Tlumacki/The Boston Globe via Getty Images) BOSTON - APRIL 21: Celeste Corcoran, center, who lost both legs in last years bombing attack, and her daughter Sydney Corcoran, right, who suffered serious leg injuries, joined Corcorans sister, runner Carmen Acabbo, near the Boston Marathon finish line at about 4 p.m. during the 118th Boston Marathon on Monday, April 21, 2014. The Corcorans were waiting for Carmen to finish the race last year when the attack happened. (Photo by John Tlumacki/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)

T.J. Maxx has apologized after a store manager in New Hampshire last week told Boston Marathon bombing survivor Sydney Corcoran that she must put her service dog in a carriage or leave the store.

Corcoran, who was struck by shrapnel and is now battling post-traumatic stress disorder, told WCVB that the animal was wearing a bright blue vest with the words "service dog" on it. She tweeted that the request to store her dog in a carriage was "unfair."

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Her mother Celeste Corcoran lost both legs in the terror attack, and said on Facebook that the incident was a "humiliating experience" for her daughter.

"Hopefully we will educate ignorant people about service dog laws and the rights that service dog owners have," Celeste Corcoran wrote.

The Americans With Disabilities Act requires that all businesses allow service animals in public areas.

T.J. Maxx released a statement saying, "We have looked into the particulars regarding this customer's experience and deeply regret that our procedures were not appropriately followed in this instance. We are taking actions which we believe are appropriate, including working with our stores to reinforce the acceptance of service animals."

Follow Morgan Rousseau on Twitter: @MetroMorgan
Follow Metro Boston on Twitter: @MetroBOS

 
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