Teen admits to using Instagram to sell weed to "rich white kids" through Main Line drug ring

New details have emerged about the so-called "Main Line Drug Ring" after one of the teenage drug dealers involved in the scheme admitted to his involvement and detailed how the marijuana sales operation worked.

These individuals were charged last month with participating in the so-called "Main Line Drug Ring." Top, from left: Domenic Curcio, Daniel McGrath, Garrett Johnson and John Roseman. Bottom, from left: Christian Euler, Neil Scott, Reid Cohen and Willow Orr. Credit: Montco D.A.'s office These individuals were charged last month with participating in the so-called "Main Line Drug Ring." Top, from left: Domenic Curcio, Daniel McGrath, Garrett Johnson and John Roseman. Bottom, from left: Christian Euler, Neil Scott, Reid Cohen and Willow Orr. Credit: Montco D.A.'s office

 

New details have emerged about the so-called "Main Line Drug Ring" after one of the teenage drug dealers involved in the scheme admitted to his involvement and detailed how the marijuana sales operation worked.

 

A 17-year-old suspect who has not been named because he is a minor could face four years' detention after pleading guilty Wednesday to three charges related to the scheme in Montgomery County Juvenile Court, including possession of marijuana with intent to deliver, and is currently remaining in custody.

 

The teenager reportedly said he created the Instagram handle "Hustle Trees Daily" and was urged by the suspects charged with operating the Main Line drug ring to sell weed to "rich white kids," the Inquirer reported.

 

That Instagram account appears to have since been deactivated.

Detectives reportedly testified that when they executed a search warrant at the teenager's home, the teenager threw a jar full of marijuana out the window - which was caught by a detective.

This teenager was allegedly working with Neil Scott, 25, and Timothy Brooks, 18, local prep school graduates who allegedly led an effort to create a “monopoly” on drug sales in the area and used high school students to deal drugs at their local schools, according to the office of Montgomery County District Attorney Risa Vetri Ferman.

Scott and Brooks were former lacrosse players and graduates of The Haverford School, an all-boys prep school near Philadelphia that charges $35,000 per year in tuition, prosecutors said.

They used their privileged connections to move drugs along suburban Philadelphia’s Main Line, a stretch of wealthy neighborhoods northwest of the city, authorities said.

The two called their drug network the “main line take over project,” and “employed students from five local high schools and three colleges as what they call sub-dealers to distribute cocaine, marijuana, hash oil, ecstasy,” Ferman said in April when the charges were first announced.

Scott and Brooks encouraged dealers, who were assigned to specific schools, to meet quotas including selling a pound a week of marijuana transported to Pennsylvania from a California supplier, prosecutors said.

During the four-month investigation, authorities said they uncovered scores of text messages and other communications in which Scott and Brooks discussed their business and their future plans.

One message read that all marijuana “on the Main Line is about to come from you and me,” officials said.

Scott and Brooks have not yet entered formal pleas on the charges.

Additional reporting by Reuters.

 
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