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Two mayoral hopefuls join forces to get out the Latino vote

Putting aside their differences, two candidates for mayor rallied to wake the "sleeping giant" of Latino New Yorkers and get them to vote.

Independent candidate for mayor Adolfo Carrión, right, shakes the hand of Democratic candidate, the Rev. Erick Salgado, at a rally to get out the Latino vote. Credit: Anna Sanders Independent candidate for mayor Adolfo Carrión, right, shakes the hand of Democratic candidate, the Rev. Erick Salgado, at a rally to get out the Latino vote.
Credit: Anna Sanders

Putting aside their differences the eve of Primary Day, two candidates for mayor rallied to wake the "sleeping giant" of Latino New Yorkers who didn't get out the vote four years ago.

"Here we have a Latino community that is the future of the city of New York and they're staying home and that's a crisis of confidence," independent candidate Adolfo Carrión said on the steps of City Hall Monday.

Latino voter turnout has been historically low: Carrión said only 22 percent of some 850,000 registered Latinos voted in the 2009 election.

"Only 189,000 of those voters believed enough and had enough confidence in the political process and in the parties to come out and vote," he said.

Carrión, who will face-off against the party nominees in November, was joined by the Rev. Erick Salgado, a Democratic candidate who says his campaign has been discriminated against by various public forums and debates.

"Every time I open my big Puerto Rican mouth, they call me a racist," said Salgado, who has painted himself as the socially-conservative choice in the Democratic primary.

Salgado also said members of the media and some polls have prematurely ruled out his campaign.

While Quinnipiac University has not included Salgado in its polls, in two others released this week, he was supported by a mere 1 percent of likely Democratic voters.

One such NBC 4 New York/Wall Street Journal/Marist Poll survey, partially conducted in Spanish, included more than a quarter of total respondents identifying themselves as Latino.

Still, Salgado hopes that more Latino voters would mean more support for bid.

"I don't care what any polls say, we always stick together," Salgado said.

Carrión, on the other hand, doesn't mind who Latinos support, so long as they cast a vote.

He said Latinos are boycotting elections "because they believe it isn't in their favor" and wants that to change.

"Come out, be counted, whoever you vote for," he said.

Follow Anna Sanders on Twitter: @AnnaESanders

 
 
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