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19 Ways to Save on a Wedding

First comes love, then comes paying for the wedding.

Weddings cost an average of $35,329 nationally — excluding the honeymoon — according toThe Knot’s 2016 Real Weddings Study. That’s the highest reported average cost since the survey beganin 2006.

But you’re not obligated to spend that much, and many couples don’t. We askedexperts how you can set a reasonable budget and cut costs on some of the most expensive elements of your upcoming nuptials.

The budget1. Be realistic

Don’t start your marriage in debt, says Anne Chertoff, a trend expert for WeddingWire. “Most couples don’t anticipate how much a wedding is actually going to cost, so they end up underestimating what they’re going to spend and then going over their budget,” she says. Set realistic spending limits from the beginning that account for all areas of your wedding. If you overspend in one area, cut back in another.

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2. Use a credit card — responsibly

It can be smart to use a credit card for wedding-related purchases — as long as you’re not taking on more debt than you can afford to pay off. Chertoff recommends using accumulated pointstoward your honeymoon, particularly if you have a card with travel rewards.

» MORE: Using a Personal Loan to Pay for a Wedding

The date3. Consider a winter wedding

Not all wedding dates are created equal. Find out which are most popular on WeddingWire’swedding date calendar. If there’s more demand for a given date, you’ll usually pay a higher price for a venue. You could score a discount for choosing a less popular month, such as January or February, Chertoff says.

4. Book a Sunday

Saturday is a popular day for weddings, but it’salso generally the most expensive day to get married. Youcan likely reserve your venue at a lower price if you hold your wedding on a Sunday, or even a weeknight.

The guests5. Put a twist on ‘plus one’ etiquette

Instead of giving all guests older than 18 a “plus one,” limit them to couples you socialize with regularly, says Sharon Naylor, author of dozens of wedding books, including “1,001 Ways to Save Money … and Still Have a Dazzling Wedding.” To avoid awkward questions, explain how you’re determining the guest list.

6. Mix up your invitations

You’ll probably want to mail out traditional invitations, says Stephanie Cain, an editorat The Knot. But you can post wedding weekend itineraries on your wedding website and email save-the-date alerts. That’ll save you the cost of printing and postage.

The dress7. check outa prom shop

Brides aren’t finding dresses at just the bridal shop these days, Naylor says. You can pick up a white dress in the prom or party dress section of any department store. The popularity of colored dresses makes formal gowns a nice substitute, too.

The national average spent on a wedding dress was $1,564 in 2016, according to The Knot’s latest Real Weddings study. A simple Google search for white prom dresses pulls up options that cost a fraction of that.

8. budget foryour accessories

There’s more to your dress budget than the dress. Cain suggests taking extras such as tailoring fees, shoes, jewelry and a clutch into account when setting a spending limit.To save on your veil, Chertoff recommendsmaking it your “something borrowed” and wearing a family member’s.

The venue9. negotiate

Lots of unexpected expenses can pop up during planning,including cake-cutting and corkage fees or power for your DJ and photo booth. Naylor says you don’t have to take them as they are. If a cost seems unreasonable, respectfully request to have it removed.

10. Use the venue’s resources

Some venues provide tables and linens, Cain says. If you opt for a backyard wedding, you’ll have to rent items like these. Always read a venue’s contract in its entirety before signing so you know what is and isn’t included.

And keep an eye out for requirements. You might not want to be obligated to use the venue’s caterer, for instance.

» MORE: NerdWallet’s Wedding Costs Savings Calculator

The decor11. communicatewithyour vendors

Naylor says some floral designers have warehouses with excess inventory they’re willing to give away or lend out for free. Once you’ve placed an order, ask about expanding your options.

12. borrow from other newlyweds

Ask friends who have recently gotten marriedif you can borrow centerpieces or other items that they have left over.

13. Scout out decorations at craft stores

Look for wedding decorations — especially light-up decor — in places like craft stores. Theyhave “more than glue guns and glitter,” Naylor says.

The flowers14. Stick to in-seasonblooms

You might have your heart set on pink flowers to accent your bridesmaids’ bouquets, but consider settling for a different shade or variety. Local blooms that are in season at the time of your wedding aregenerally less expensive. Also, “local flowers tend to look fresher because they didn’t have to travel for days,” Cain says.

15. Get the most out of your flowers

A larger flower, such as a hydrangea, naturally looks fuller and takes up more space with fewer stems, Cain says. And you can repurpose ceremony flowers for the reception, instead of buying more. For instance, use a ceremony arch to adorn your sweetheart tableat the reception.

The menu16. Go for a shorter cake

The more tiers on your cake, the more it’ll cost you. Cain suggests sticking to two tiers and having sheet cakes to serve. The cake you cut for your pictures doesn’t have to feed all of your guests.

17. Cut down on drink sizes

Arrange for the bartender to serve your signature drinks in smaller glasses. “Most people will go and try the signature drink, take a sip, put it down and go back to their regular drink,” Naylor says. Minimize the cost of your bar tab by optingfor shooters.

The rest18. Choose a charitable favor

Don’t want to buy a favor for each wedding guest? Make a charitable donation on behalf of all your guests, Chertoff says. That way, you can set the amount you’re comfortable spending, donate to a cause you care about and write off the contribution on your taxes.

19. Limit your photographer’s hours

Save money by shaving off some of the time your photographer and videographer are present, Naylor and Cain suggest. You’ll likely want them there for the ceremony, but you might not need footage of the end-of-reception dancing.

Bottom line, these experts suggest keeping a close eye on your wedding spending. “Anybody — whether they have a $10,000 budget or a $500,000 budget — is still working on a budget,” Cain says.

Devote the biggest parts of your budget to the areas that are most important to you and be willing to compromise on the rest.

Courtney Jespersen is a staff writer at NerdWallet, a personal finance website. Email: courtney@nerdwallet.com. Twitter:@courtneynerd.

The article 19 Ways to Save on a Wedding originally appeared on NerdWallet.

 
 
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