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2010 shaping up to be year of the documentary

This summer, the editor-in-chief of fandango.com,Chuck Walton, decided to watch 100 films in 100 days. And although hemight be approaching movie fatigue at this point, he was able to talkwith us about what documentaries will soon be big.

This summer, the editor-in-chief of Fandango.com, Chuck Walton, decided to watch 100 films in 100 days. And although he might be approaching movie fatigue at this point, he was able to talk with us about what documentaries will soon be big.


“Documentaries have changed,” he says about the genre. “It’s not the same old ‘I’m going to educate you about something’ kind of film, but rather it’s a great style of storytelling.”

The Tillman Story
“I saw Restrepo over the summer and really loved it,” Walton says regarding the film chronicling the year journalist Sebastian Junger and a photographer spent with an American platoon in Afghanistan. “(The Tillman Story) is a different, more personal take on the Iraq war,” he says of this doc about the death of former NFL player and U.S. Army Cpl. Pat Tillman.

Freakonomics
Walton is curious about Freakonomics not only because it’s based on the best-selling book, but also because the style of the film is so appealing. “Each vignette (five in all) is by a different documentary filmmaker, including Alex Gibney and Morgan Spurlock,” he says of the award-winning Taxi to the Dark Side and Super Size Me directors, respectively.

Waiting for Superman
“Anyone who is a fan of An Inconvenient Truth will be interested in this film,” says Walton. Directed by Davis Guggenheim (An Inconvenient Truth, It Might Get Loud), Superman analyzes the failures of U.S. public education by following students navigating the system.

 
 
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