Donald Trump at the Trump Taj Mahal in Atlantic City, New Jersey, in 1990.Getty Images

His name appears on golf courses, luxury hotels, casinos and, possibly in the near future, a museum.

 

A group of Atlantic City locals want to memorialize President-elect Donald Trump's impact on the New Jersey shore town through artifacts and stories from those who worked at his properties over the last three decades, the Press of Atlantic City reported Saturday.

 

The band of residents hopes such a museum could bring tourists to the area, and would be of historical interest now that the billionaire real estate magnate will be sworn in as president next month.

 

One member and a doctoral student at Temple University, Levi Fox, started walking tours along the boardwalk, offering an in-depth look at the Republican's 26-year involvement with Atlantic City.

 

Fox told the Press that, much like first-lady-to-be Melania Trump's birthplace of Sevnica, Slovenia, has seen a boom in tourism since the election, Atlantic City could similarly benefit from such celebrity.

Trump opened the Taj Mahal in 1990 for $1 billion. By the next year, under his ownership, the Taj filed for bankruptcy. The following year, two more Trump casino holdings— Trump Marina and Trump Plaza— also filed for bankruptcy.

By 2014, after several years of financial restructuring, Trump Entertainment Resorts filed again for bankruptcy protection. Shortly thereafter, Carl Icahn snatched up the properties.

But even Icahn couldn't maintain control. Trump Taj Mahal, once billed as the Eighth Wonder of the World, shuttered in October when negotiations with an employees' union broke down. The Taj became the fifth casino to close in the once-glitzy mecca of gambling and luxury.