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A Magnificent return to vinyl

<p>Dedicated music lovers still equipped with their turntables and record collection should be on the look out because vinyl is back.</p>

Local indie label distributes 7-inch records



magnificent sevens photo


Davy Love is owner and founder of Magnificent Sevens.





Dedicated music lovers still equipped with their turntables and record collection should be on the look out because vinyl is back.





For something that seemed to be long gone and forgotten, vinyl seems to be making its way back into the spotlight. According to Davy Love, who is best known as the promoter and DJ of Toronto’s infamous Blow Up Britpop club nights, 7-inch vinyls are here to stay.





Does this mean technology is taking a few steps back and moving away from the ever so popular CD? And are people actually picking up records instead of CDs?





“They sure are — vinyl is getting bigger and I know that in England, Germany, and Sweden, 7-inch vinyl has really picked up over the past year,” says Love. “Last year, I think it only counted for two per cent of sales, and now this year it’s 15 per cent of all music sales in England. So I figure whatever happens in England will eventually happen here, that’s the way it works musically.”





After 10 years of hosting Blow Up nights at various nightclubs, Love says it was time to close the door to one era and say hello to something new. So Love started up Magnificent Sevens — a record label distributing music strictly on vinyl.





“When we started Blow Up, we were the only thing around doing what we were doing, I saw four generations of kids went through the club and have graduated and got married,” he said. “I thought it would be cool to go back to the whole format of doing singles as the ultimate medium and on 7-inch vinyls.”





But this record label isn’t the only one putting out records. Love says there are a lot of punk labels that have been doing this for a while.





“Our goal is to be sort of, I wouldn’t say popular music, but more accessible music for indie kids today,” says Love, owner and founder of Magnificent Sevens. “And doing that on 7-inch vinyls as opposed to doing just punk-rock. But I mean, I would love to see a vinyl revolution happen.”





Though Love does take on Canadian bands, especially those Toronto-based, he has recently signed on a band from Sweden. He explains that the basis for his wanting to start this record label is to give unknown bands that have had a hard time getting a record deal with other labels some exposure.





“I get a lot of demos sent to me, we put it on our myspace.com that we accept demos, which most record labels today don’t do,” says Love. “We’ll listen to anything — electronic, country, I don’t care what it is. If it’s actually heartfelt music, then you know the band is doing it for the right reasons and not because they want to be a rock star.”


 
 
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