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Address doesn't always live up to the name

Every day’s a rainy day for Leonora Benjamin. And that’s just fine with the Pickering resident who’s lived under the threat of inclement weather for 23 years.

Every day’s a rainy day for Leonora Benjamin. And that’s just fine with the Pickering resident who’s lived under the threat of inclement weather for 23 years.

The residents of Rainy Day Drive, as it turns out, are blessed with just as much blue sky as the folks of, say, Sunshine Street in Toronto. And they’re a cheery bunch to boot.

“It’s a great neighbourhood. Everyone looks out for each other,” says Benjamin, whose family was among the first in the subdivision where addresses were inspired by Gordon Lightfoot songs.

There was a time when roads and royalty were the moniker match of choice. Hence, the dozens of Kings and Queens, Georges and Victorias that clutter GTA maps. Canada’s historical figures were similarly honoured. But more recently, municipal policies have turned street-naming into an art that walks a fine line between originality and practicality. If the tag has a nice ring to it, so much the better — unless it’s Cowbell Cr.

That idea hit a dead end with roads scholars in Brampton’s planning department over concerns about offending South Asians who consider the cow a sacred animal, says spokesperson Gordon Smith.

 
 
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