Amelia Earhart Credit: Wikimedia Commons Amelia Earhart
Credit: Wikimedia Commons

Researchers have been trying to track Amelia Earhart’s plane after it mysteriously disappeared in 1937.

More than 10 years ago, The International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery (TIGHAR) isolated the Pacific island of Nikumaroro as the location where her plane likely went down. Now, the organization says underwater sonar images taken during a 2012 island visit support the location theory.

TIGHAR believes Earhart and her navigator, Fred Noonan, put down on the coral flats at the western end of the island.

 

Since discovering the location in 2000, other clues have been found including shards of plexiglass from a windscreen and aluminum from an aircraft body. Theories also suggest that Earhart and Noonan survived on the island for some time before dying of injury or infection.

The grainy photo reveals there is something approximately 600 feel below the surface. TIGHAR is calling it an “anomaly.”

“The most prominent part of the anomaly appears to be less than 32 feet long,” TIGHAR writes on its website.

Earhart’s plane was reportedly 38 feet 7 inches long.

Ric Gillespie, TIGHAR’s executive director said the next step is to “raise money to hire an independent comprehensive analysis of all the sonar data from last summer’s expedition and to determine what else we missed.”

Follow Mary Ann Georgantopoulos on Twitter @marygeorgant

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