Anti-idling motion may do more harm than good for TTC

That’s the outlook for the TTC’s diesel bus fleet if the agency has to abide by a motion passed Wednesday, which would limit legal idling time for vehicles, including city buses, to no more than one minute.

Higher repair bills and, ironically, more pollution.

That’s the outlook for the TTC’s diesel bus fleet if the agency has to abide by a motion passed Wednesday, which would limit legal idling time for vehicles, including city buses, to no more than one minute.

TTC chair Adam Giambrone said Thursday requiring compliance could cause more pollution if it interferes with the turbochargers found in most of the TTC’s diesel engines.

A turbocharger makes the bus more fuel-efficient. It runs at about 100,000 rotations per minute rather than 2,000 rpms. Because it runs so hot, it needs about three minutes to cool down in an idling phase or the part can seize, putting the bus out of service. It costs about $8,000 to replace.

Even if the turbocharger doesn’t fail, the burned oil created in this process sends more particulate matter into the air.