Running off after smashing into another car in the supermarket parking lot could soon be a thing of the past.

 

Scientists are developing aircraft-style black boxes for cars that will record everything about your driving behaviour. The devices will record your steering, braking and speed to when you honk your horn, with videos from inside and out.

 

The data will be invaluable to police and insurance companies with regards to speeding offences and accidents, vital whether you’re proved guilty or innocent.

 

Eventually cars will feature computer systems that can store all that information, but communicate even more. Computer chip giant Intel has taken the “black box” idea a step further in its recently revealed Connected Car, a prototype that uses IT innovations to make driving safer, more efficient and more fun.


An internal computing platform, similar to one that you’d find in a laptop, coupled with 4G wireless connectivity, allows the car to relay information and video via the internet, so you’ll be informed if someone tries to break in or crashes into it. It also means that you can connect with your car remotely over the internet, so you can check your fuel or even start the car.


Eventually computers in cars will make driving safer. By monitoring your location, speed and distance from other cars they will be able to warn you when you’re driving dangerously, or even take control if there’s a car in your blind spot or if you’re swerving out of your lane (some cars on the market already use similar collisions avoidance systems).