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Big past, bright future

Well-priced homes near downtown are not easy to find, which is whyCorktown frequently crops up on Torontonians' lists of neighbourhoodsto consider living in.

Well-priced homes near downtown are not easy to find, which is why Corktown frequently crops up on Torontonians' lists of neighbourhoods to consider living in.

The area in the city’s Downtown East Side — terminating at the DVP and the Gardiner Expressway — has a rich history and a lot of remaining potential to tap into.

Located close to the St. Lawrence Market, and just east of the downtown core, Corktown contains residents sharing a mix of income levels and businesses ranging from upscale design firms to quick and easy eateries.

The upcoming 2015 Pan-Am Games will be centred near Corktown and should bring a lot of attention to the area.

Average property value: $324,489 Rent: $986

Homes you’ll see:
Victorian row houses and tightly-packed, urban-style townhomes located on small, narrow sidestreets. The area has gone through several phases of house-flippers and renovators.

Bargain spot: The north has more opportunities for lower prices than the south, which borders on the Distillery District.

Hot spots: Dominion on Queen (500 Queen St. E.) has been a Corktown standby for more than a hundred years, serving a mix of popular and craft beers, and straightforwardly-tasty food. The Young Centre for the Performing Arts (55 Mill St., Bldg 49) houses the Soulpepper Theatre Company and George Brown College’s theatre school. Morning Glory Cafe (457 King St. E.) is a renowned breakfast joint with excellent coffee and a friendly vibe.

Education: Inglenook Community School (19 Sackville St.), Jarvis Collegiate Institute (459 Jarvis St.), Nelson Mandela Park PS (440 Shuter St.), Regent Park/Duke of York Jr PS (20 Regent St.), St. Paul Catholic School (80 Sackville St.), Voice Intermediate School (55 Mill St.)
Condos & developments: The King East (King Street & Parliament Street), The Ninety (Queen Street East & Broadview Avenue)

Getting around: TTC Streetcars along Queen Street East and King Street East with a north-south bus route along Parliament Street.

Final word: Long heralded as the next big thing, Corktown and the eastern stretch of King Street before the DVP have never quite lived up to past hype, though things appear to be changing. Homeowners have continued to discover the neighbourhood’s value and its just-out-of-downtown charm. If you really want to live in up-and-coming area that isn’t already long past deserving that moniker, Corktown is your place.

 
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