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Boobquake rally set to rock Vancouver today

Up to 100 women are expected to show off their cleavage outside theVancouver Art Gallery this afternoon for Boobquake, a cheekyinternational event celebrating our right to immodesty.

Up to 100 women are expected to show off their cleavage outside the Vancouver Art Gallery this afternoon for Boobquake, a cheeky international event celebrating our right to immodesty.

Boobquake was launched last week by an Indiana student, Jennifer McCreight, 22, in response to an Iranian cleric who claimed earthquakes are caused by women who dress in a suggestive manner.

“Many women who do not dress modestly ... lead young men astray, corrupt their chastity and spread adultery in society, which increases earthquakes,” Hojatoleslam Kazem Sedighi told Iranian media on April 16.

He is Tehran’s acting Friday prayer leader.

Since then, tens of thousands of people have joined the rebuttal campaign to show some skin today, including Angela Squires, organizer of Boobquake Vancouver.

“I thought, ‘how ridiculous,’” said Squires, who will be showing off her legs instead of her cleavage because she’s had a double mastectomy.

“People — especially (those) who have a perceived authority — are coming out with ridiculous statements that are not necessarily questioned. And it’s important for all of us to question what comes at us.”

Squires is organizing a scientific experiment, inviting women to the VAG at 4 p.m. to show off some skin in an attempt to provoke seismic activity.

Seismometers will be there to record shakes.

“It’s a celebration of our rights and choice,” Squires said. “The idea is not to be indecent, but to ... (have) fun.”

Amanda Wanner, a student at the University of B.C., will be attending the event.

“I love that (this is) a light-hearted way to deal with a serious issue,” Wanner said. “It’s all about (exposing) only what you’re comfortable with.”

McCreight wrote a note on her blog, blaghag.com, that she can’t believe how quickly the cause has grown.

“It started as a silly joke that I hurriedly fired off since I was about to miss the beginning of House,” McCreight wrote. “I never thought it would get the attention it did.”

“I’m a firm believer that when someone says something so stupid and hateful, serious discourse isn’t going to accomplish anything — sometimes light-hearted mockery is worthwhile.”

 
 
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