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Boston bombing suspect charged in hospital bed

Federal prosecutors charged badly wounded Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev in his hospital bed on Monday, but details of the charges were sealed, a U.S. court official said.

A photograph of Djohar Tsarnaev, who is believed to be Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, a suspect in the Boston Marathon bombing, is seen on his page of Russian social networking site Vkontakte (VK), as pictured on a monitor and a mobile phone Credit: Reuters A photograph of Djohar Tsarnaev, who is believed to be Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, a suspect in the Boston Marathon bombing, from the Russian social networking site Vkontakte.
Credit: Reuters

Federal prosecutors charged badly wounded Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev in his hospital bed Monday, but details of the charges were sealed, a U.S. court official said.

"There has been a sealed complaint filed," said Gary Wente, circuit executive for the U.S. Courts for the First Circuit, who said a magistrate judge was present when Tsarnaev was charged at his bed in Beth Israel Deaconess Hospital in Boston. Tsarnaev was listed in serious condition.

Tsarnaev, 19, an ethnic Chechen college student suspected of carrying out the attacks with his older brother, Tamerlan, was unable to speak after he was captured with throat injuries sustained during shootouts with police.

Police declined to comment on media reports he was communicating with authorities in writing.

"There have been widely published reports that he is (communicating silently). I wouldn't dispute that, but I don't have any specific information on that myself," Boston Police Commissioner Ed Davis told CNN. "We're very anxious to talk to him and the investigators will be doing that as soon as possible."

Police captured Tsarnaev on Friday night to cap a violent week of blasts, shootouts, lockdowns and one of the largest manhunts in U.S. history.

His older brother, Tamerlan Tsarnaev, 26, died after a gunfight with police early Friday morning.

The city of Boston crawled back to normal Monday, a week after twin bombs exploded at the crowded finish line of the city's famous marathon road race, killing three people and wounding 176. Ten of the injured lost limbs.

The crime scene around the blasts was still closed but was expected to reopen within a day or two. Signs declaring "Boston Strong" hung about the city.

Memorial services were set Monday for two of those killed in the bombings: Krystle Campbell, a 29-year-old restaurant manager, and Chinese graduate student Lingzi Lu.

An 8-year-old boy, Martin Richard, was also killed.

 
 
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