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Burned if you do, burned if you don’t

Ted Kindos faces two choices: Continue to be called a bigot or break the law. Either way, he risks going bankrupt.

Ted Kindos faces two choices: Continue to be called a bigot or break the law. Either way, he risks going bankrupt.

Kindos owns Gator Ted’s Tap & Grill in Burlington. Four years ago, he asked a marijuana smoker to step away from his front door.

The medically licensed toker complained to the Ontario Human Rights Commission of discrimination against a disabled person. He won. Kindos was about to pay the fine and post obligatory signs saying, “We accommodate medicinal marijuana smokers,” when a different government agency told him he could lose his liquor licence. Serving anybody possessing a controlled substance — prescribed or not — is against the law.

“Heads I win, tails you lose,” Kindos said yesterday.

Kindos must continue to fight the complaint or lose his business, he says.

Legal bills could also bankrupt him but a lawyer has agreed to assist and take the next stage without charge. The Ontario Human Rights Tribunal will hear the case this summer.

 
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