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<p>They might create psychedelic folk-rock, but don’t make the mistake of assuming the members of Black Mountain are partaking in any substances while doing it.</p>


Folk-rock outfit loves being in the studio



Vancouver-based Black Mountain arrive in Toronto tonight for a sold-out concert at Lee’s Palace as part of their tour in support of latest album In The Future.





They might create psychedelic folk-rock, but don’t make the mistake of assuming the members of Black Mountain are partaking in any substances while doing it.





“We all have our moments, or whatever, but we don’t feel like we have to be stoned to write or create a new song,” Matt Camirand said. “Sometimes it works in your favour, but most times it doesn’t.





“Most times it’s like anyone who smokes a joint —you end up sitting there and watching an Austin Powers movie and not being very productive.”





Camirand is the bass player in the Vancouver-based band, which is touring North America in support of its second full-length release, In The Future. The followup to 2005’s self-titled album, the new disk has been called an epic, mixing folk-pop with modern masterpieces.





The album includes Bright Lights; a nearly 17-minute epic. Camirand said the band actually trimmed some of the fat off the length before recording it in one take.





“We are just really into being in the studio, a whole bunch of us are audiophiles and recording aficionados — so it’s a kid-in-the-candy-store kind of vibe,” Camirand said.





While other groups may overdo the recording process, adding extra microphones so they can fix and edit later, Camirand said Black Mountain likes to keep it simple.





“If there is a special effect we want that kind of sounds really crazy, we will track it at the moment we are recording it, getting the spirit of it as opposed to adding it on later on.”





That sense of knowing what they want is one of the reasons Camirand said the band was weary of bringing an outsider, John Congleton, into the studio to mix this album. Everybody, he added, is paranoid about letting people into their creations.





“It was sort of a leap of faith,” he said.





“We just wanted to do what we did with the first album, but we wanted to step it up a bit and make it more of a challenge recording wise.”


 
 
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