Coach made me do it: Bert

<p>Former Canucks star Todd Bertuzzi, whose attack on Steve Moore left the Colorado rookie with a broken neck and concussion, ending his hockey career, was provoked by Vancouver coach Marc Crawford, stunning new court documents allege.</p>

 

Crawford allegedly said Moore must pay price, court documents show


 

 

jeff vinnick/getty images

 

Todd Bertuzzi talks to the media ahead of a March 10, 2004, NHL disciplinary hearing into his punch-from-behind that ended Steve Moore’s hockey career. Court documents filed yesterday by Moore’s lawyer allege that former Canuck coach Marc Crawford instigated the incident.



Former Canucks star Todd Bertuzzi, whose attack on Steve Moore left the Colorado rookie with a broken neck and concussion, ending his hockey career, was provoked by Vancouver coach Marc Crawford, stunning new court documents allege.



During a March 8, 2004, game between the Canucks and Avalanche, Bertuzzi punched Moore from behind. After lying in a pool of blood for several minutes, Moore was removed on a stretcher and has been ordered by doctors to retire from the NHL.



Documents filed yesterday in Ontario Superior Court by Moore’s lawyer quote Bertuzzi saying that between the second and third periods of the game, with Colorado winning 6-2, "Crawford angrily pointed to Steve Moore’s name on the Avalanche roster board and told his players that Steve Moore ‘must pay the price.’"



The new court documents allege that as Moore lay motionless, "a television camera panned to a smirking Crawford."



Crawford now coaches the Los Angeles Kings. Two Kings media relations staff members did not return phone messages.



Moore’s claims have not been proven in court and Bertuzzi has filed a so-called cross claim that argues if legal damages are awarded, the Canucks should be required to pay them. The team has filed a similar claim against Bertuzzi.



When Vancouver police questioned Crawford and several Canucks players after the attack, none admitted that anything was said during the between-periods intermission to foment anger against Moore.



Vancouver city police Sgt. Ross Jackson said late yesterday that if someone files a complaint, players or coaches who misled or lied to police could face obstruction charges.



Also yesterday, Moore increased the amount he’s demanding to $38 million from $15 million.




















Nonis aware of plan




  • Court documents quote former Canucks senior vice-president of hockey operations Dave Nonis admitting under questioning "that Crawford pointed to Steve Moore’s name (among others) just prior or during the March 8, 2004, game and said that Steve Moore must ‘pay the price tonight.’"




 
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