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Cold weather can’t dampen Fringe spirits

<p>Mother Nature’s wicked ways be damned — the 26th annual International Fringe Festival continued its reign as the leading theatre festival in North America, organizers said yesterday as the 11-day festival ended.</p>




Marc bence/for metro edmonton


Brucey Carroll of Melbourne, Australia, juggles while laying on an elevated bed of nails yesterday during his final performance at the 26th Annual Fringe Festival, which wrapped up last night. The fest sold around 74,000 tickets, according one of the organizers.





Mother Nature’s wicked ways be damned — the 26th annual International Fringe Festival continued its reign as the leading theatre festival in North America, organizers said yesterday as the 11-day festival ended.





“The weather last year — for our 25th anniversary —was amazing; everything went as it should,” said Julian Mayne, executive director of the festival.





“This year, it started out damp and just kept going,” although he said the cooler temperatures didn’t impact the performers’ payouts. “The ticket sales for indoor shows remained very strong, and the artists will take home about $60,000 more than last year.”





The festival was a success in other ways too.





“We sold 74,000 tickets,” despite some admitted technical issues with the new online ticket sales system. “It worked out great in the long run, although it took about four days to get all the glitches out of the system,” said Mayne. “It was a learning curve,” one of several the festival faced as changes to the ticketing system and to venue locations were implemented. Because we have a festival that’s part of a four-block radius, moving things around keeps things feeling fresh.”















Sober move



  • Executive director Julian Mayne said that moving the beer tent from the middle of the venue to 85 avenue “took some getting used to.



 
 
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