Controversial education legislation draws further protests

A proposed change to legislation that would require teachers to notifyparents when they teach controversial topics may put Alberta educators'jobs at risk for violating the rights of their students.

 

On its website the Human Rights Commission states its purpose: "To ensure all Albertans have equal opportunity to earn a living, find a place to live and enjoy public services without discrimination."

However a proposed change to legislation that would require teachers to notify parents when they teach controversial topics may put Alberta educators' jobs at risk for violating the rights of their students.

 

"They censor people," said Janet Keeping of the Sheldon Chumir Foundation. "Aren't teachers backlogged enough?"

The classroom is where many kids are exposed to new ideas, learn to listen respectfully and develop critical thinking skills.

Dan Shapiro, a researcher with the Sheldon Chumir Foundation, said that is one of the standout aspects with the Canadian public education system.

 

If the legislation passes, parents can pull their kids from the classroom should they not want their kids exposed to certain ideas.

 

"There's already a provision in the school act to address this concern," says Frank Bruseker, head of Alberta Teacher's Association.

The opposition called the proposed change embarrassing, but Tory MPs defended the bill in Monday's question period.

Second reading is Wednesday, but many feel a court designed to protect people from race and gender discrimination has no place in the school system.

 
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