Cooking up a recession-proof business

The city may feel the chill of a cooling economy, but downtown foodvendors are still cooking up sales despite the financial woes,according to a popular sausage merchant.

The city may feel the chill of a cooling economy, but downtown food vendors are still cooking up sales despite the financial woes, according to a popular sausage merchant.

Klaus Marahrens, owner of Old Munich and The Yodeling Sausage, has been operating his street vending station since 1980 and business is booming as usual at his Stephen Avenue and 1st St. SW location.

“This is my third recession and it’s as busy as it has always been. People always have five dollars. The price is right and the quality is great,” Marahrens told Metro, shortly after serving dozens of people during lunch rush.

If anything, business is more dependent upon the weather, Marahrens said.

“If it’s sunny and warm out, there’s lots of business. When it’s cold and gloomy, it isn’t as busy. But normally I get the people walking by, business people, couriers and a lot of regulars,” he added.

Regular customer Blake Pollock said he has been eating at the Yodeling Sausage for years.

“For $5.25 you get a sausage and a pop. The price is great, you can’t beat it. And the weather is definitely a bonus for me,” he said.

Downtown office worker Ed Boyarchuk said he walks two blocks from his work to snack on various vendor food along Stephen Avenue, not only for the price, but because it’s quick, too.

“You wait in line for just five minutes and you have yourself a filling meal,” Boyarchuk said.

 
 
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