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Dr. Dog finds sound that fits

<p>OK ladies, it’s that time of year again — you know, the season where we show more skin, and consequently, worry more about our physical appearance.</p>




Free-spirited Philadelphia rockers Dr. Dog play Lee’s Palace tonight.





OK ladies, it’s that time of year again — you know, the season where we show more skin, and consequently, worry more about our physical appearance.





Sometimes to stay fresh, one plows the rich furrow of days gone by.





Take five-piece pop act Dr. Dog for instance, who, on their third and newest hit album We All Belong, channel psychedelic sounds straight out of the late ‘60s and early ‘70s. That murky, low-fi, jam-band vibe has made them the top dogs (Couldn’t resist!) on the Philadelphia indie scene, earned them comparisons in the press to the Beach Boys’ Pet Sounds, The Band and The Beatles, and endeared them enough to My Morning Jacket to share a 2004 tour with the band whilst still relatively unknown.





You may get a protest or two from front man Scott (Taxi) McMicken (all the band members have a nickname beginning with a T). He says Dr. Dog pulls from the present just as much as they do the past, but he understands why listeners would make such connections.





“There’s definitely been people from time to time who have interpreted our sound that way,” he says. “But I don’t give two s**** about that. The influences for us come from as much ‘60s music as they do from contemporary music. I’m 100 per cent aware and I would never deny the fact that our music is stuff that people already understand.





As for me, I’m an Arctic Monkeys listener as much as anyone else is.”





In order to keep an unrefined integrity to We All Belong, Dr. Dog recorded the disc at a home studio on a 24-track, 2-inch tape machine — as opposed to previous work on their trusty 8-track. The technology is more than 30 years old, but for the band the upgrade made them feel like fishes out of water, prompting a complete redo of the album.





“We All Belong was the first album that anyone really gave us money to make,” McMicken says. “We took the money and we bought some equipment that we really didn’t understand how to use. And with trial and error ... It was grunt work, but we all made ourselves pretty good producers and engineers.”