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Dream motivates informer

In the dream, Mubin Shaikh is in a room filled with strangers. He is uncomfortable. A door opens and a familiar face appears. It is Agent J.J.

In the dream, Mubin Shaikh is in a room filled with strangers. He is uncomfortable. A door opens and a familiar face appears. It is Agent J.J.

After waking up, Shaikh reflects on the vision. Until then, he had been consumed with doubt about whether he should work with the RCMP to infiltrate an alleged homegrown terror cell.

When he was a source for the Canadian Security Intelligence Service, Shaikh had enjoyed full anonymity and the freedom from having to testify. But if he agreed to work with the RCMP, he’d likely have to take the stand, possibly putting his family at risk and jeopardizing their reputation within the Muslim community.

It was a difficult decision. But Shaikh believed the dream was a message from God, telling him to follow the advice of CSIS Agent J.J. and work with police in foiling the alleged terror plot by the so-called Toronto 18.

The powerful influence of that dream surfaced in a Brampton court yesterday when Agent J.J. testified about the transfer of Shaikh’s services between the two agencies in early December 2005, just weeks before a so-called terrorist training camp occurred.

Defence lawyer Mitchell Chernovsky, whose client was among the 18 people charged with terror-related offences in the summer of 2006, read details of the dream that were contained in the agent’s notes.

Although Chernovsky’s client was found guilty in September, he and co-counsel Faisal Mirza have brought forth a motion to have the charge stayed, alleging Shaikh was a state agent who entrapped their client, which is especially troubling because he was 17 at the time.

The hearing before Justice John Sproat resumes today.

 
 
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