Our diet doesn’t only affect our weight, it also plays into our mood and brain health. Nutritionist Susan Kleiner, author of “The Good Mood Diet,” tells Metro how you can control your mood through your food.



Is there such a thing as good and bad mood foods?


Of course. Different foods have different functions that have both long- and short-term effects on our body and mind. Eggs contain the compound choline that is responsible for every thought and movement in the body. Low levels of choline have been linked to memory loss, mood swings and an increased risk of Alzheimer’s. In terms of bad mood foods, fried food and foods high in pro-inflammatory fats such as corn oil, sunflower oil and bean oil can make people feel more sluggish.

 

How should we be combining the different food groups?

Ideally, people should be combining lean protein, healthy carbohydrates and healthy fats at every meal. Basing it on an intake of 40 percent carbohydrates, 30 percent protein and 30 percent fats is a good start.

 

How important is serotonin?

Serotonin is the brain’s natural up-lifter. Dairy foods,, especially milk, contain high levels of tryptophan — which builds serotonin in the brain.