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Feeling good for a living

<p>With the third season of hit makeover show X-Weighted just airing onthe Slice Network, the show’s resident self-esteem guru Fred Connorswalks the walk and talks the talk.<br /></p>


With the third season of hit makeover show X-Weighted just airing on the Slice Network, the show’s resident self-esteem guru Fred Connors walks the walk and talks the talk.

The confident, youthful 41-year-old with 25 years of experience as a stylist says looking good starts on the inside.

“How we look is directly related to how we feel. People are starting to realize their success in the world is based on how much self-esteem they have,” Connors said.

X-Weighted follows obese Canadians trying to drop the fat and live healthier lifestyles and Connors helps participants want and strive for a better sense of self-worth to find satisfaction in their own lives. The key is getting people to step back and see how to use their proverbial lemons to make lemonade.

“I look at difficulty not as a disaster but as an opportunity. It’s amazing how the process of self-exploration can lead people to personal fulfillment,” Connors said.

Despite wearing many hats successfully — Connors is an accomplished stylist, clothing and cosmetics designer as well as a regular on X-Weighted — the one Connors identifies with most is that of entrepreneur — he runs his own hybrid café-spa-art gallery in Halifax.

True to form, he lives the very same lessons he teaches on X-Weighted.

“I’ve always been tactile and creative. I have an intuitive sense of how to relate to people and I’m very proud of the things I’ve been able to accomplish,” Connors said.

“I’m very able to look at individuals and show them things that aren’t working about themselves and whether their ideologies are aligned with what their goals in life are.”

He thinks his ability to be frank is a big part of his success on the show.

“When I see someone who’s in a dysfunctional relationship, I don’t have that feeling of discomfort drawing attention to it if doing so will ultimately improve the quality of that relationship,” he said.

Self-esteem is a two-way process that Connors says reflects not only your own thoughts and goals but also the way you relate to other people.

“The way we feel about ourselves, the way we feel about the people around us and the way we relate to our community all defines the way people perceive us,” he said.

 
 
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