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Halifax's 'zombie scene' is undead and well

Tourists aboard the Harbour Hopper laughed Saturday as zombies on aSpring Garden Road sidewalk extended their arms to the amphibiousvehicle, searching for sustenance.

Tourists aboard the Harbour Hopper laughed Saturday as zombies on a Spring Garden Road sidewalk extended their arms to the amphibious vehicle, searching for sustenance.

“Braaaaains,” the zombies moaned loudly.

Dressed up as prom dates back from the dead, Rebecca Junkin and Adam Gunn staggered slowly down the city sidewalk with about 100 other zombie fanatics during the fourth annual Halifax Zombie Walk. In her shredded prom dress, Junkin tried her best not to break character.

“It’s to pay tribute to zombie culture and just have a good time and maybe scare some people,” she said of the event. Gunn, wearing a graduation cap, grunted his agreement.

“It’s definitely becoming more and more popular,” event organizer Alex Isenor said about zombie culture.

Though the gory parade stalled traffic, most of those waiting in cars on Spring Garden Road laughed or snapped photos with camera phones.

Justin Payne, a self-described zombie fiend with blood smeared all over his chin, said he’d been into zombies since he played the Resident Evil video game as a kid.

“They’re so sloppy,” he said. “They kind of represent a lot of the population. A lot of people are just mindless zombies.”
Payne says he’s grateful for Halifax’s “zombie scene.”

“Cities have, like, a music scene -- we have a zombie scene,” he said.

Local filmmaker Chris MacIssaac took advantage of the costumed crowd to help make “Zombimentary,” a spoof of the film Shark Water.

“This year I wanted to go in it, but then I seen how big it was getting,” MacIsaac said. “So I just said, ‘okay, screw that. I’ve got to get a camera.’”

The zombie crowd in the graveyard behind him then roared their approval. A group of zombie dancers had just finished the full routine from Michael Jackson’s Thriller.

 
 
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