A program
designed to help people in the Ottawa area who are homeless or at risk
of becoming homeless due to addiction problems will receive a cash
infusion.

 

The Champlain Local Health Integration Network announced Monday 72 new
supportive housing units in the Ottawa region. These will help people living
with addictions increase stability and security in their lives and
reduce pressure on hospital emergency rooms.

 

The Champlain LHIN is receiving $959,100 for the first year of a
three-year program as a part of a $16-million provincewide investment
in 1,000 supportive housing units for people with substance use issues.

 

The funding will go to rent supplement and supportive services — such
as case managers who provide support on issues such as landlord-tenant
relations, budgeting and crisis intervention — in existing housing
units.

"Supportive and affordable housing is the answer to many of the
challenges facing health care today," said Champlain LHIN CEO Robert
Cushman. "The new services will result in fewer emergency room visits
and hospitalizations among adults suffering from addictions. It‚s the
right investment at the right time, and will benefit communities across
our region."

This model provides supportive housing that is integrated into the
community for homeless people with substance abuse issues, whether or
not they are enrolled in treatment programs, the Champlain LHIN stated
Monday.

Providing stable, safe and supportive housing not only improves the
mental health and well-being of those who need the service, but opens
doors to healthier communities, said Minister of Health and Long-Term
Care David Caplan in a release.