How can I stop my nosebleed? How did this happen in the first place?

 

Nosebleeds generally occur because there are injured or exposed blood vessels on the surface of the mucous lining of the nasal septum — the partition between your nostrils. A blunt injury to the nose, scratching an itch inside your nostril with a finger or dry inflamed mucous membranes due to cold weather or an upper respiratory infection are the most common causes of nosebleeds. Nosebleeds are not a result of high blood pressure, although the stress of a nosebleed may elevate blood pressure readings, especially in people who already have hypertension.

 

What to do:

 

Blow your nose with a tissue to get out any blood clots.

 

Pinch the fleshy portion of your nose over the nostrils between your thumb and index finger constantly for seven to 10 minutes, while breathing through your mouth. This will usually stop the bleeding.

In order to prevent re-bleeding, use an over-the-counter saline nasal spray to keep your nasal passages moist.

If these home remedies are not effective or if you are on blood thinners, you should see an ENT doctor, or go to an urgent care center or emergency room.

What not to do:



Don’t insert a tissue into your nostril. Removing it will make you bleed again.

Don’t tilt your head back. This will allow the blood to drain into your throat, and swallowed blood will cause nausea and vomiting.

Applying ice to your nose will not stop the bleeding, but may be useful in reducing swelling from a blunt injury to your nose.