As you read this week’s column, I’m enjoying a little rest and relaxation in Ireland. Though I’ve only been here a few days, I’ve already consumed my body weight in Guinness Draught so am now working my way to whiskey, which I’ll spell with an ‘e’ like they do here on the Emerald Isle.

 

The cult of Irish whiskey has been gaining membership for much of this century at the expense of single malt scotches and their blended brethren. An Irishman’s lighter, sweeter side — thanks in part to a process of triple distillation — seems to have more over-ice appeal for non-brown booze drinkers than scotch, many of which taste like they could take the paint off your car.

 

A classic whiskey like Jameson ($30.00 - $31.99) — first made in Dublin in 1780 — is a super smooth spirit with an orange marmalade aroma and creamy sweet finish. It’s so easy on the palate that you could almost drink it straight from the bottle, which I still might.

 

Northern Ireland’s Bushmill’s, the oldest distillery on the island, was licensed in 1608 with its Black Bush ($36.99 - $37.64) a quintessential Irish drop layered with warm malt and spice. Sláinte


Prices reflect the range across the country. Some products may not be available in all provinces. Peter Rockwell is the everyman’s wine writer, working in the liquor industry for more than 25 years and traveling the globe looking for something to fill his glass and put into words.