It’s not the heat, it’s the humidity

If you’re coming into work this morning looking like you came from thegym and not just off the GO train — flushed skin, frizzed hair andsweating buckets all around — blame the humidity.

 

If you’re coming into work this morning looking like you came from the gym and not just off the GO train — flushed skin, frizzed hair and sweating buckets all around — blame the humidity.

Environment Canada’s humidity reading at Pearson International Airport at 7 a.m. yesterday was at a whopping 98 per cent — meaning that Toronto was at a near saturation point as to the amount of water vapour the air could contain.

“It’s very humid out. It’s about as humid as you can get in Toronto. You might as well be in a fog,” says Environment Canada’s senior climatologist Dave Phillips.

“It’s like night and day compared to last year,” he says.

Phillips says that between Canada Day and now, we’ve experienced 23 days where the humidex (a combined reading of both the temperature and humidity to determine perceived temperature) was over 35, compared to just three days during the same time last year.

 

There have been nine days where the humidex was over 40, an unsafe level, up from two days last year.

“But the good thing about this summer is that we haven’t had the haze. We’ve had heat and humidity, but not the haze. It’s been healthy (this year) for air quality,” Phillips adds.

The skyrocketing humidity in Toronto currently at near-saturation point could pose a health risk, as with any other extreme weather measurement, Environment Canada warns.

The only possible upside to humid weather in Toronto? Better skin.

“We may be sweating buckets, but at least our skin is soft,” says Phillips.