A Greenpeace activist from Vancouver is one of 14 people being detained in Indonesia after the group protested at one of the world’s largest pulp and paper mills, shutting down the facility.

Stephanie Goodwin, 36, who spoke to Metro Vancouver from her hotel room on the island of Sumatra, said she wanted people to know the mill is a massive contributor to greenhouse gas emissions.

Goodwin was on a boat near the mill as 12 Greenpeace activists scaled four cranes, then dangled there with banners reading “Climate Crime” and “Forest Destruction: You can stop this” to stall pulp exports.

“Indonesia is the world’s third largest emitter of greenhouse gas emissions and 80 per cent of their emissions come from deforestation and land degradation,” Goodwin said.

She was arrested on Tuesday and spent nearly 14 hours at the police station, where she was interrogated with the other protesters.

“I don’t know for certain what will happen,” said Goodwin, who suspects she’ll be deported today. Her passport has been taken away and is being held by police.

“I don’t think it ever really feels pleasant or safe to be detained by the police in any fashion, no matter where.

“Of course I weigh the risks before doing an activity like this and for me, what’s really important is providing outcomes that actually encourage climate change.”