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Boston police amp up MBTA station patrols after NYC terror attack

After an explosion in the New York City subway Monday morning, Boston officials are remaining vigilant.
mbta transit police south station
MBTA police were on alert outside Boston's South Station on Monday after a terror attack in New York City. Photo: Derek Kouyoumjian

The Boston Police Department is amping up patrols around major MBTA stations after a terror attack in the New York City subway near Port Authority Bus Terminal Monday morning.

The explosion injured four people, including the suspect Akayed Ullah, a 27-year-old Bangladeshi national who reportedly made the pipe bomb himself, which was strapped around his body.

The bomb detonated around 7:20 Monday morning and disrupted service on multiple subway lines. Multiple departments are involved in the investigation, including the New York Police Department, the New York Fire Department, Port Authority Police, MTA Police and more.

BPD said that Boston officers are monitoring the incident as well and officials here are maintaining contact with the NYPD during the investigation.

New York City officials confirmed the bombing was a terror attack and said they were not aware of any other threats. 

There did not appear to be a specific threat to the Boston area either, Boston police said.

Still, officers are stepping up their patrol at major MBTA stations and ensuring that they stay vigilant in light of the attack.

On Sunday, local emergency crews took part in a simulated drill of a train evacuation at the MBTA’s Emergency Training Center on Foundry Street. MBTA Transit Police, the Boston Fire Department, Boston Emergency Medical Services and MBTA Operations were on scene at that drill.

The drill, which was a routine response exercise, the MBTA said, specifically stimulated a derailed train inside an unused tunnel, according to the Boston Globe.

“These exercises go a long way to strengthening the city of Boston’s resilience should something happen,” Steven McHugh, the deputy superintendent of Boston EMS, told the Globe. “It gives us an opportunity to get to know each other while the adrenaline isn’t flowing so much as a real emergency.”

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