A sunny disposition surrounded the 122nd Boston Marathon despite rainy race weather

Thousands of runners and spectators braved April showers at the 2018 Boston Marathon on Monday.

It was a wet and windy day on Monday for the 30,000 runners who took on the 122nd Boston Marathon, but that didn't stop them from hitting the puddled pavement to sprint toward that finish line. Nor did it keep their loved ones away.

 

As in past years, several thousand spectators descended along the Boston Marathon route to watch the runners take on this year's race. The challenge was made even harder thanks to relentless spring showers that were accompanied by chilly winds. Even so, the crowds were in good spirits. For some, that was due to the endorphins. Others had their own personal inspiration to thank for their enthusiasm.

 

Runner Emily Yeh-Johnson's husband Dean Johnson held an enlarged photo of his wife at Monday's race. Johnson was a student at Virginia Tech when a shooting massacre took place in 2007. Emily was running to honor the victims of that tragedy, as well as the 2013 Boston Marathon bombing.

 

“Today being [the anniversary of the shooting] is significant, so Emily’s also wearing ribbons while she runs to support both Boston Strong and Virginia Tech,” he said. “We’re glad to be here to support both Boston and Virginia Tech.”

 

Erik Morris came from Columbus, Ohio, to run the Marathon — it was his fourth time doing so. “I was here two years after the [Boston Marathon] bombing and it was similar weather. I did well then and I did well now. It’s always interesting to see all the different people with different injuries and different disabilities. It gives you a lot of motivation to think, 'Oh my gosh, they're doing this despite that [challenge]. That's impressive.'"

Chelsea Oswald, another Ohio resident, had just finished her first Boston Marathon: "I was trying to break three hours and I ended up doing that, so that was my goal. To experience the Boston Marathon and all the other runners has been so inspiring."

Laura Fox travelled all the way from Anchorage, Alaska, just to "see how fast I could do it." 

"I felt OK, it was cold. I didn't get my goal time. It was a tough day so I was just happy to finish," said Fox. "It was hard. At some point, it was raining so hard everyone was just kind of laughing."

 
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