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#HearHerHarvard: Women across country show support for Harvard sororities

Regulations enforcing sanctions against members of "single-gender social groups" are on the horizon at Harvard, but sorority members are sharing why they believe the female-focused groups are so important.
Harvard University's Widener Library. (Photo: Wikimedia Commons)

With a strict crackdown on single-gender social clubs imminent at Harvard University, women across the country are showing support on social media for Harvard sororities

Using the hashtags #WithoutMySorority and #HearHerHarvard, women across the country who are members of different sororities are sharing their “most influential sorority moments” and why being in a female-focused social group was important for them.

“#WithoutMySorority Kappa Alpha Theta, I would not be the strong woman that I am today,” one woman tweeted. “We must stand up for our constitutional right to assembly @Harvard #HearHerHarvard.”

“I stand with the sorority women of Harvard because #WithoutMySorority, I would not have a place to call home on campus,” another said. “My sisters fill my heart & many others' hearts with joy through love, support, & our philanthropy. These are lifelong bonds, not just for 4 years #HearHerHarvard.”

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Harvard has been in a long battle with single-gender social clubs on campus. Though the school has moved away from its previous suggestion of banning fraternities, sororities and other groups, officials still said that they will penalize members of such organizations.

In May 2016, Harvard announced sanctions barring members of single-gender groups, including Greek organizations and final clubs, from receiving campus leadership positions, captain roles on varsity teams and endorsement from the school for fellowships.

The sanctions went into effect with the class of 2021, and school officials said they will release an official plan outlining how they will enforce these sanctions sometime in January or February, according to the student newspaper The Harvard Crimson.

One sorority has since gone gender-neutral, but others said that they would continue to recruit during the spring semester despite the threat. These sororities, Alpha Phi, Delta Gamma and Kappa Alpha Theta, stressed the importance of “empowering women-only spaces” for students.

That sentiment was echoed in the many tweets on Tuesday. Each of those sororities urged their members through social media to share their stories.

“On Tuesday, January 23, we ask that you join us in showing support for our sisters and ALL sorority women attending Harvard University. They have shown immense bravery in their mission to prove the value of support systems for women. #HearHerHarvard,” the general Alpha Phi Twitter account tweeted with a picture of the Harvard sorority chapter presidents.