With the end of September comes the 17th annual Stephen Siller Tunnel to Towers 5K run/walk in New York City.

Considered one of the top 5K races in America, Sunday’s run retraces the final steps FDNY firefighter Stephen Siller took as he strapped on his gear and ran through the Hugh L. Carey Tunnel (formerly known as the Brooklyn Battery Tunnel), to the Twin Towers on 9/11.

Proceeds from the 5K support programs of the Stephen Siller Tunnel to Towers Foundation.

Stephen Siller Tunnel to Towers start time, location

The 17th annual Stephen Siller Tunnel to Towers 5K takes place on Sunday, Sept. 30 at 9:30 a.m.

 

It begins at Ikea Parking Lot 9 at 1 Beard St. in Red Hook, Brooklyn, and travels through the Hugh L. Carey Tunnel before ending at the corner of West Street and Murray Street in Manhattan.

Registration began in May, and for those who are interested in running or walking in Tunnel to Towers but haven’t signed up yet can register through race day for $80. (Online registration will close at 11:59 p.m. Saturday, but participants can register on-site Sunday). Anyone signing up after Sept. 24 will not receive a timing chip.

The course for Sunday's Tunnel to Towers, which retraces the final steps of FDNY firefighter Stephen Siller on 9/11. (Tunnel2Towers.org)

Stephen Siller Tunnel to Towers street closures

One tube of the Hugh L. Carey Tunnel will be closed from 10 p.m. Saturday until 7:45 a.m. Sunday for the 17th annual Stephen Siller Tunnel to Towers 5K. The tunnel will be fully closed from 7:45 a.m. until approximately 3 p.m. for the race.

Additionally, access to the Manhattan-bound HLC from local streets in Brooklyn will be blocked starting at 7 a.m., the MTA said. Motorists will only have access via the Gowanus Expressway.

RELATED: These 9/11 memorials honor the victims and resilience of NYC

According to the NYC DOT, these are the street closures for the Stephen Siller Tunnel to Towers race:

Manhattan:

Battery Park Underpass
West Street between Battery Place and Warren Street
West Thames Street between West Street and Dead (Battery Park Esplanade)
South End Avenue between West Thames Street and Liberty Street
Liberty Street between West Street and Battery Park Esplanade Murray Street between North End Avenue and West Street
Warren Street between West Street and River Terrace
North End Avenue between Warren Street and Vesey Street
Vesey Street between West Street and River Terrace
River Terrace between Warren Street and Vesey Street

Brooklyn

Richards Street between King Street and Bowne Street/Hamilton Avenue
Van Brunt Street between Visitation Place and Hamilton Avenue
Bowne Street between Van Brunt Street and Richards Street
Seabring Street between Van Brunt Street and Columbia Street
Commerce Street between Van Brunt Street and Columbia Street
Delevan Street between Van Brunt Street and Columbia Street
Verona Street between Van Brunt Street and Columbia Street
Visitation Place between Van Brunt Street and Richards Street
Dwight Street between Beard Street and Commerce Street/Columbia Street
Hamilton Avenue between Henry Street and the Brooklyn Battery Tunnel (Woodhull Street)
Columbia Street between Verona Street and Hamilton Avenue
Beard Street between Richards Street and Dwight Street

How the Stephen Siller Tunnel to Towers came to be

Stephen Siller was a 34-year-old father of five when he raced from Brooklyn to the World Trade Center on 9/11, where he died trying to save others. (Tunnel2Towers.org)

On 9/11, 34-year-old Siller, a father of five, had just ended his shift at Brooklyn’s Squad 1 and was about to play golf with his brothers when he heard on his scanner that a plane had hit the North Tower of the World Trade Center.

After calling his wife, Sally, to ask her to tell his brothers he’d catch up with them later, he went back to the firehouse to get his gear. The Brooklyn Battery Tunnel was already closed due to the attacks, so Siller left his truck, strapped on his 60-pound gear and raced on foot through the tunnel to the World Trade Center, where he died trying to save others. 

RELATED: NYU study sheds light on why only some 9/11 firefighters developed lung disease

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