Lyft Line has grown 103 percent in the past year, thanks partly to the share-the-ride feature’s popularity in New York City. (Lyft)
Lyft Line has grown 103 percent in the past year, thanks partly to the share-the-ride feature’s popularity in New York City. (Lyft)

In the past year, Lyft Line has grown by 103 percent, thanks in part to the share-the-ride feature’s popularity in New York, one of the Top 5 cities using the option, Lyft announced Wednesday.

 

Passengers who use Lyft Line share vehicles with other users traveling in the same direction and can pay up to 60 percent less for doing so. 

 

“We’re thrilled by the growth we’ve seen in Lyft Line nationally — and here in New York,” said Vipul Patel, general manager for Lyft New York. “It’s clear that more and more people are sharing the ride to get where they need to go.”

 

Though Patel could not disclose how much of that 103 percent growth can be attributed to local Lyft users, he did say “passengers in New York are increasingly choosing Line as an affordable option that reduces cars on the road.”

 

To that end, more than 7 million single-use cars have been taken off the road because of Lyft Line’s popularity, and more than 2 million gallons of gas and roughly 58 million miles in travel time have been saved as well, according to new Lyft data.

Given our love for brunch and the city’s nightlife scene, the most popular times New Yorkers are using Lyft Line are in the morning and late-night hours on Saturdays and Sundays.

“We see passengers taking Lyft rides for many reasons, including to connect with transit and to move between areas that may not be served by public transportation,” Patel said, adding that 19 percent of city passengers use the service for that connection. “Nearly a quarter of rides start in low-income areas. I think both of these stats show the role Lyft is playing in increasing mobility for those who need affordable and reliable rides most.”

Gov. Andrew Cuomo last week announced that New York’s 2019 budget will include a $2.75 surcharge on for-hire vehicles traveling below 96th Street in Manhattan, a fee that aims to offset congestion and create what the governor called a “long-term funding stream” for the city’s troubled mass transit system.

"We support the meaningful first step that the governor, Senate and Assembly has taken to address congestion and transit needs in the City of New York, especially incentivizing shared rides,” Lyft said in a statement to Metro. “However, congestion will not be fully addressed until the governor and legislature enact a comprehensive plan that also addresses all commercial vehicles and the real issue driving congestion: personal vehicles. We look forward to continuing to work with the governor and the legislature on implementing the comprehensive recommendations as outlined in the Fix NYC plan to ensure New Yorkers have access to a spectrum of affordable, reliable and convenient transportation options."