NYC Transit president hosted first of new monthly Twitter Q&A

Andy Byford, president of NYC Transit, answered straphanger questions about the subway on Twitter.
andy byford, nyc transit, nyc subway, mta, nyc transit president
Andy Byford, the president of NYC Transit, is starting a monthly Twitter chat session to hear from straphangers. Photo: Marc A. Hermann / MTA New York City Transit

If you usually lament about your morning MTA commute on Twitter, you’ll now have a chance to use that online platform to speak to the NYC Transit president directly every month.

 

New York City Transit President Andy Byford hosted a Twitter Q&A on Thursday to hear directly from frustrated straphangers.

 

The online exchange is part of an ongoing effort to improve transparency and customer service, the MTA said, and will be a monthly occurrence. The first chat session was March 29 from 10:30 a.m. to noon.

 

To participate, riders tweeted out their questions within that time period using the hashtag #AskNYCT. Byford and NYC Transit’s new Chief Customer Officer Sarah Meyer responded live from the subway Rail Control Center using the @NYCTSubway Twitter handle.

 

“I think it’s important to have regular and direct contact with transit riders – that’s why I ride subways and buses everywhere and why I’m excited to do these chats,” Byford said in a statement. “Other members of my staff will be more engaged with customers than ever before by also participating in these chats.”

The MTA wanted the first chat to specifically focus on subways, but going forward Byford will take questions on any and all aspect of NYC Transit.

Next month’s session will center around buses and Access-A-Ride paratransit service, and future chats will feature other members of NYC Transit leadership.

Byford started at NYC Transit in January after five years as CEO of the Toronto Transit Commission. He held similar chat sessions to hear from riders while heading up that public transit system.

During the first-ever chat session, Twitter users asked questions about L train capacity, how the subway handles "sick passengers" who are often the cause of delays and even how conductors communicate. Here's a little of what MTA officials had to say.

 
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