For more than 320 years, Trinity Church Wall Street has been both a house of worship and a tourist attraction thanks to notable permanent residents like Alexander Hamilton.

But starting Monday, the nave, or main body of Trinity Church, will be closed while the landmarked building begins a two-year, $98.6 million renovation. Though the nave will be closed, New Yorkers, tourists and parishioners alike can still visit the Chapel of All Saints and Trinity’s churchyard, which will remain open during the work.

With the renovations expected to end in the spring of 2020, church services will take place at St. Paul’s Chapel just up Broadway. This is not the first time Trinity Church’s sister chapel will serve as its stand-in — parishioners relocated there after the Great Fire of 1776 and again in 1839 when the current church was constructed. The last major renovation of Trinity Church took place in 1945.

“Rejuvenating Trinity Church is part of our mission to provide a spiritual home for lower Manhattan — our parishioners, neighbors, workers and visitors,” said Rev. Dr. William Lupfer in a statement. “As a vibrant, diverse and growing congregation, we are excited to undertake this work so that future generations also can cherish this remarkable church.”

 

What Trinity Church’s renovations will entail

About 2.5 million people visit Trinity Church each year, its website said, and when renovation work is completed in 2020, they can expect to see portions of the church returned to architect Richard Upjohn’s original 1846 plan.

The chancel will be restored to its original size, with an additional 140 seats, while the interior walls and ceilings will be painted to reflect the original stone design of Upjohn.

Additionally, Trinity Church’s two-year work will also include:

• repairing and restoring stained-glass windows, as well as designing and installing new ones
• installing new organs in the church and Chapel of All Saints
• installing ramps and removing stairs to make the entire landmarked building ADA accessible
• redesigning and refurbishing existing pews
• upgrading interior and exterior lighting
• adding gender-neutral restrooms
• renovating the choir room with acoustic panels and other enhancements
• constructing a glass-and-steel canopy along the south exterior for inclement weather protection